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Berlin Long Sleeve

Size Guide

XS

Chest 34"
Front Length 23.75"
Back Length 24.5"
Sleeve Length 24.25"

S

Chest 36"
Front Length 24.37"
Back Length 25.12"
Sleeve Length 24.75"

M

Chest 38"
Front Length 25"
Back Length 25.75"
Sleeve Length 25.25"

L

Chest 40"
Front Length 25.65"
Back Length 26.37"
Sleeve Length 25.75"

All measurements are garment sizing

Pride Of Place

A versatile long sleeve to take you from your warm-up in Berlin to post-race recovery runs and into the ramp up to your next race.

Ultra-Lightweight, Breathable 
Quick Drying Open Air Mesh 
Sublimated Printing

Fabric
100% Polyester

Care
Machine Wash Warm With Like Colors
Hang Dry

Berlin '19

Known for its very fast, very flat course, Berlin is a bucket-list race for hitting a PR or a BQ. Since the race was founded by Berlin baker, Horst Milde in 1977, 11 world records have been set on the course. Ten of those records have been raced on the post-reunification course, which loops its way from the Brandenburg Gate through Berlin’s historic neighborhoods. Add in cool weather and the chance to enjoy Oktoberfest when the race is done, and you’ve got a recipe for an iconic Marathon Major.

Berlinisch
Blau

Prussian Blue, also known as Berlinisch Blau, is a dark blue color that was accidentily synthesized by Berlin alchemists Johann Jacob Diesbach and Johann Conrad Dippel in the early 18th century. Stable, bright and lightfast, it revolutionized the art world, from Watteau working on Rococo paintings in Paris to Gainsborough’s portraits in London. It inspired Hokusai’s iconic painting The Great Wave off Kanagawa and Picasso used it liberally in his Blue Period. Commercially, it made its way onto everything from flags, clothing, wallpaper and tea, and became the official uniform color of the Prussian army.

Berlin Collection

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